Your house is being towed

Thousands of people in California live out of their cars. And for those people, the threat of parking tickets is also the threat of losing their home. But first: We’ll look at the week in business and economic news, and tell you everything you need to know about Tesla and the SEC. Plus: 28,000 public service workers applied for student loan forgiveness, but only about 4 percent got it. What happened?

Let’s look at the big picture

As the United States and Mexico finalize details of a trade agreement, the Trump administration has written a rule that Mexican auto manufacturers pay workers a $16 hourly wage or face a 2.5 percent tariff. But the extra taxes might be cheaper than raising wages. We’ll look at what a deal could mean for labor in Mexico, plus give an update on the World Trade Organization and trade talks with Japan. Then: 70 mm film is making a comeback in Hollywood, and that means there’s a revival in the fading film projectionist workforce. 

Everything is fine!

According to the Federal Reserve, anyway. We’ll play some of Chair Jerome Powell’s statement from today’s rate hike announcement and unpack how the central bank sees this economy right now. Then, with the NAFTA deadline looming, we’ll look at how close the United States, Mexico and Canada really are to a deal. Plus, your tariff questions, answered by a customs broker.

Caught in the middle of a trade war

Tariffs on more than 5,000 new Chinese products went into effect this week, and American importers are scrambling to catch up. The notice was so short that some shipments were on the water on the way to the United States when tariffs hit. We’ll talk about how companies are dealing with the unexpected cost. Then: Why Arby’s parent company wants to buy Sonic, and the dramatic drop in foreign investment last quarter. Plus, a conversation with Creative Artists Agency co-founder Michael Ovitz.

Mergers Monday

We’re starting the week with two big mergers in the headlines: SiriusXM is buying the streaming music pioneer Pandora, and American fashion company Michael Kors is expected to buy Versace, the Italian fashion house. Those deals have more in common than you might think. Then, speaking of bilateral deals, Iowa’s agriculture secretary wants the United States to “re-engage” in trade talks with China, Canada and Mexico, which are some of farmers’ biggest customers. We talked with him about how his state is feeling the trade war. Plus: Why you should buy art from women.

The 5G cold war

Which country will be the first to implement the next generation of wireless technology? The race to 5G is on between the United States and China. The questions is, who foots the bill? Also on today’s show: Love ’em or hate ’em, electric scooters are gaining ground. California Gov. Jerry Brown says adult electric scooter riders won’t have to wear helmets starting Jan. 1. The new law is a big victory for companies like Lime and Bird, which have had tense relationships with city governments on issues like crowding and pedestrian accidents. Plus, we’re joined by Leigh Gallagher from Fortune Magazine and Rachel Abrams from the New York Times for the Weekly Wrap.

The home renovation show boom and bust

The trade war with China is raging on, but the markets seem unbothered. As the Dow and the S&P 500 hit new highs this week, we look at why the markets don’t seem to be impacted by the trade war. Meanwhile, the United Kingdom is facing its own trade woes with Brexit only six months away. How will Britain’s shipping industry change? We go to Britain’s largest port to find out. Also on today’s show: Before “Fixer Upper,” there was “Flip This House,” “Flip That House” and “Flipping Off,” but the flipping stopped when the recession hit. We speak to Steven Kurutz, New York Times features reporter, about how home renovation shows have reflected the housing crisis. 

Who paid the price for the financial crisis? Was it enough?

After the dust settled on the Great Recession, financial institutions ended up paying over $200 billion in settlements to the U.S. government and people affected by the crisis. Some settlement deals broke records. But where’d that money go, and was it enough? As part of our ongoing coverage of the 10 years since the crisis, Divided Decade, we’ll try to find out. Then: The federal government announced it will cap refugees entering this country at 30,000 next year, a record low. We’ll look at Erie, Pennsylvania, one economy that relies on refugees to stay afloat. Plus, we’ll talk about manufacturing’s dirty little secret: Most factories don’t know where their supply chains come from, making the impact of tariffs tough to predict.

Use-it-or-lose-it season

China and the U.S. traded more tariffs since just yesterday, and many companies have said they’ll pass the cost onto consumers. So when can Americans expect a price hike? We’ll talk about it, and interview a tile industry spokesman who supports the tariffs. Then: With the budget expiring at the end of the month, federal agencies are hurrying to spend their budgets before time runs out. Some are taking things down to the literal last minute. Plus, hard truths with rapper and author Dessa.

Tariffs, but make it fashion

The Trump administration will impose tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese products next week as President Donald Trump first threatened in June. Hundreds of people have testified and submitted written comments about their impact, including Julia Hughes, president of the United States Fashion Industry Association. We’ll chat with her, as well as Canadian aluminum producers stinging from the trade war. Plus: A conversation with Tender Greens CEO Denyelle Bruno.