It’s been a weird week

Among the federal employees still working during the government shutdown are those at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. They put out this morning’s jobs report, and it’s better than anyone expected: 312,000 new jobs. We’ll talk about what that does (and doesn’t) tell us about the economy and recap a very volatile week for markets. Plus, is it just us or are movie credits getting longer?

Would you let a resort lock your phone away?

We can feel it all the way from China. Apple’s revised forecast yesterday helped torpedo stocks today. But this might just be a leading indicator of the problems a lot of companies will have as the second-biggest economy in the world slows down. We look at what’s next for Apple and how American businesses are dealing with the slowdown. Also on the show: Professional sports teams are scoring more and more points each game. How is that helping the bottom line? Then: Be honest, are you guilty of going on vacation and staying glued to your phone? You’re not alone, but some businesses want to change that. We’ll talk about why a growing number of hotels are trying to persuade vacationers to take a break from their smartphones. 

Kai visits the dark web

When a company like Target or Yahoo gets hacked, where does the stolen personal information end up? A lot of times, it is up for sale on the dark web. Cybersecurity researcher Stephen Cobb gives Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal a tour of the dark web and shows us how stolen information is sold. Also on the show: China’s slowdown. A new survey reveals that Chinese manufacturing declined in 2018. We’ll talk about what’s behind the decline, what Chinese officials may do in response and how that is affecting American companies. And is Brexit still happening? Maybe. British Prime Minister Theresa May has until Jan. 14 to convince Parliament to approve her plan or face the possibility of a “no-deal” Brexit. What would that look like?

Don’t say we didn’t warn you

Last year was full of major economic events, and 2019 looks like it will be too. We’ll talk about what we’re watching in the global economy and what to expect from trade, Brexit and government spending. Speaking of global economies, six Pacific-Rim nations including Japan, Australia and Mexico are lowering tariffs on a number of products and services as of today. So what does that mean for American farmers? Then: The Chinese are likely to land a probe on the far side of the moon for the first time in history. China is spending billions on space exploration, but why now? 

New year, same shutdown

Hundreds of thousands of federal workers and contractors are going into the new year without pay as the government shutdown stretches into 2019. But a new year also means a new Congress. We’ll talk about how lawmakers plan on tackling the spending bill and what to expect from Capitol Hill in the coming months. As of tomorrow morning, wages are set to increase in over 20 states, yet the federal minimum wage remains unchanged since 2009. More on what that means for the economy. Then, we’ll talk to Elizabeth White, author of “55, Unemployed and Faking Normal,” about how people 55 and older are coping without retirement savings.  

Closed indefinitely

The federal government is still shut down and is set to remain that way until the new year. For hundreds of thousands of federal workers, that means more time without pay. On today’s show, government employees and contractors share stories about how the shutdown has affected them. Then: A federal climate change report predicts dire consequences for American farmers if steps aren’t taken now. We check in with farmers who are weighing their options for the future. Plus, we’ll talk with Curbed’s Patrick Sisson about how online shopping is increasing pollution.  

*cues “We’re in the Money”*

Our retirement savings are looking a little healthier today. The markets rebounded, and after weeks of losses and volatility, we’ll have the latest on what’s happening on Wall Street. Meanwhile, the partial government shutdown drama continues. We’ll talk about the way government data affects the markets and what happens when agencies stop gathering that data. Then: This was a long year for tech. In 2018, we saw security breaches, privacy scandals and congressional hearings. We’ll look back at the year’s tech news with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood. Also on today’s show, another installment of “How to Be a …” This time, we’ll learn who’s responsible for choosing the music in that favorite TV or movie scene of yours from music supervisor Morgan Rhodes.

Merry Christmas, Wall Street. You get a break today.

U.S. markets are closed for Christmas, which means that investors can take a deep breath from this month’s volatility. We’ll zoom out and talk about the disconnect between plummeting stock prices and what’s keeping our economy strong. Then: Consumer confidence is high, meaning stores are banking on a great holiday retail season. So why do retailers offer steeper discounts online than in-store? We’ll do the numbers. Also on the show today: avocados. We’ve all heard tired jokes about millennials and avocados, but some are betting on the fruit to be more than just a food trend. We’ll talk to Alessandro Biggi and Francesco Brachetti, the co-founders of what they call the world’s first avocado bar.

Can Trump fire Jay Powell?

’Twas the night before Christmas, and the markets continued to dive, so we start with the big picture question: Can President Donald Trump remove Jay Powell as head of the Federal Reserve? Like many things in life, the answer is a bit complicated. Then, let’s address the giraffe-shaped void in our retail lives this holiday season. With Toys R Us filing for bankruptcy, where are holiday shoppers getting their toys? Later, we talk about the business model behind subscription beauty boxes with Birchbox CEO and co-founder Katia Beauchamp.

It’s beginning to look a lot like shutdown

As Congress anticipates a federal shutdown, some federal workers could face the holidays without a paycheck. We hear from employees and contractors about their concerns going into the holidays. Earlier this week, the Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the fourth time this year, increasing rates from 2.25 percent to 2.5 percent. Fed Chair Jerome Powell has plans to hike interest rates two more times in 2019 if the economy stays strong, but some want to pause rate increases. Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari joined us to discuss why he thinks the Fed should be patient with raising rates and the risks associated with those rate hikes. Then, a dispatch from tax hell. With filing season on the horizon, accountants are scrambling to understand the new tax law.